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Hirusha Viraj
Hirusha Viraj

Troubleshooting Split APKs: Why They Are Not Compatible with the Current Device with ABIs x86 and What to Do


- How split APKs work on Android devices - The difference between split APKs and app bundles H2: What are ABIs and why do they matter? - Introduction to ABIs and their role in native code execution - The supported ABIs for Android devices - The difference between ABIs and instruction sets H2: What does it mean when none of the 1 split apks are compatible with the current device with abis x86? - The possible causes of this error message - The possible solutions to this error message - The best practices to avoid this error message H2: Conclusion - A summary of the main points of the article - A call to action for the readers H2: FAQs - A list of five frequently asked questions and their answers Table 2. Article with HTML formatting What are split APKs and why do they matter?




If you are an Android developer or user, you might have encountered the term "split APKs" at some point. But what are split APKs and why do they matter? In this article, we will explain what split APKs are, how they work on Android devices, and how they differ from app bundles. We will also discuss what it means when none of the 1 split apks are compatible with the current device with abis x86, and how to fix this issue.


Introduction to split APKs and their benefits




Split APKs are a way of creating multiple APK files that contain only the code and resources specific to each device configuration, such as screen density or CPU architecture. This way, users can download only the parts of the app that they need, reducing the app size and saving bandwidth and storage space. Split APKs also allow developers to update parts of the app independently, without affecting other parts.




but none of the 1 split apks are compatible with the current device with abis x86



How split APKs work on Android devices




Split APKs are very similar to regular APKs they include compiled DEX bytecode, resources, and an Android manifest. However, the Android platform is able to treat multiple installed split APKs as a single app. Different types of split APKs include:


  • Base APK: This is the main APK file that contains the core functionality and common resources of the app. It is required for every device.



  • Configuration APK: This is an optional APK file that contains resources for a specific device configuration, such as language, screen density, or CPU architecture. For example, there can be a configuration APK for Spanish language, another one for high-density screens, and another one for ARM-based CPUs.



  • Dynamic feature APK: This is an optional APK file that contains code and resources for a specific feature of the app that can be downloaded on demand. For example, there can be a dynamic feature APK for a camera feature, another one for a map feature, and another one for a payment feature.



The Android platform uses a mechanism called to install or uninstall dynamic feature APKs on demand.


The difference between split APKs and app bundles




You might be wondering how split APKs differ from app bundles, which are also a way of creating optimized APK files for different device configurations. The main difference is that app bundles are not directly installable on devices they are a publishing format that Google Play uses to generate and serve optimized APK files for each user's device configuration. App bundles also require Google Play signing, which means that developers have to upload their app signing key to Google Play.


Split APKs, on the other hand, are directly installable on devices they are a distribution format that developers can use to create and manage multiple APK files themselves. Split APKs do not require Google Play signing, which means that developers can keep their app signing key locally.


The advantage of app bundles is that they simplify the process of creating and publishing multiple APK files developers only have to upload one app bundle file to Google Play, and Google Play takes care of generating and serving optimized APK files for each user's device configuration. App bundles also support advanced features such as , which allow developers to customize how and when their app's features and assets are downloaded to devices.


The advantage of split APKs is that they give developers more control and flexibility over creating and distributing multiple APK files developers can use their own tools and methods to generate and serve split APKs, and they can also support devices that do not have Google Play installed. Split APKs also support features such as , which allow developers to create app experiences that can be launched instantly or run on wearable devices.


How to install split apks on x86 devices


Split apks compatibility issues with x86 abis


Why are split apks not working on my x86 device


How to merge split apks into one apk for x86 devices


Split apks vs app bundles for x86 devices


How to build multiple apks for different abis


How to configure splits for screen densities and abis


How to optimize split apks for entry-level devices


How to support different OpenGL texture formats with split apks


How to use Android NDK with split apks


How to publish multiple apks on Google Play


How to declare configuration support in split apks manifest


How to sign and manage multiple apks


How to test split apks on x86 emulators


How to troubleshoot split apks installation errors


How to update split apks on x86 devices


How to use bundletool to generate split apks


How to use adb to install split apks


How to use apk analyzer to inspect split apks


How to use gradle to create multiple apks


How to reduce the size of split apks for x86 devices


How to enable instant apps with split apks


How to handle dynamic feature modules with split apks


How to use app signing by Google Play with split apks


How to use Firebase App Distribution with split apks


How to use App Center Distribute with split apks


How to use APKMirror Installer with split apks


How to use SAI (Split APKs Installer) with split apks


How to use APKCombo Installer with split apks


How to use APKPure App with split apks


How to use XAPK Installer with split apks


How to use APKMODY Installer with split apks


How to use APK Installer Pro with split apks


How to use APK Editor Pro with split apks


How to use APK Extractor Pro with split apks


How to use APK Easy Tool with split apks


How to use APK Studio with split apks


How to use Apktool with split apks


How to use ZipSigner with split apks


How to use ZArchiver with split apks


Benefits of using multiple apk support for x86 devices


Drawbacks of using multiple apk support for x86 devices


Best practices for using multiple apk support for x86 devices


Alternatives to using multiple apk support for x86 devices


Future of multiple apk support for x86 devices


Challenges of multiple apk support for x86 devices


Solutions for multiple apk support for x86 devices


Tips and tricks for multiple apk support for x86 devices


What are ABIs and why do they matter?




Now that we have explained what split APKs are, let's move on to another term that is related to this topic: ABIs. What are ABIs and why do they matter? In this section, we will explain what ABIs are, how they affect native code execution on Android devices, and how they differ from instruction sets.


Introduction to ABIs and their role in native code execution




ABI stands for Application Binary Interface, which is a set of rules and conventions that define how different components of a software system interact with each other at the binary level. For example, an ABI specifies how a program calls a function in a library, how data is passed between them, how registers are used, how memory is allocated, and so on.


ABIs are important for native code execution on Android devices, because native code is compiled for a specific ABI. Native code is code that is written in languages such as C or C++, and that runs directly on the device's processor, without the need for an intermediate layer such as the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) or the Android Runtime (ART). Native code can offer better performance and access to low-level features than Java code, but it also requires more care and attention to ensure compatibility and stability.


The supported ABIs for Android devices




Android devices support different ABIs depending on their processor architecture and instruction set. Processor architecture is the design of the processor's components and how they work together, while instruction set is the set of commands that the processor can execute. The supported ABIs for Android devices are:


  • armeabi-v7a: This is the ABI for 32-bit ARM processors that support the ARMv7-A instruction set. This is the most common ABI for Android devices.



  • arm64-v8a: This is the ABI for 64-bit ARM processors that support the ARMv8-A instruction set. This is the newer and faster ABI for Android devices.



  • x86: This is the ABI for 32-bit Intel processors that support the x86 instruction set. This is a less common ABI for Android devices, mainly used for emulators or some Chromebooks.



  • x86_64: This is the ABI for 64-bit Intel processors that support the x86_64 instruction set. This is also a less common ABI for Android devices, mainly used for emulators or some Chromebooks.



To ensure compatibility and performance, developers should provide native libraries for each supported ABI in their


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